Denver HVAC Repair

If the unit isn't turning on, check on it outside to make sure the condenser is still running. It should be fully plugged in and the thermostat should be set. Lower the thermostat by a few more degrees than your typical setting. You should hear it power on after doing so. If that doesn't take care of the problem, check your fuse box. You could have a blown fuse or a tripped circuit that's causing the air conditioner to not turn on.
We’re located in Lexington and service the surrounding area, so stop on by if you’re looking for a new furnace or want to set up an appointment to have one of our techs do a consultation at your home and help you figure out which system is ideal for your home. Schedule furnace repair or a furnace service appointment with James Heating & A/C, Inc using our online scheduler, or if you need help more quickly, give us a buzz at 336-853-6070. 
Per hour service charges are not the only way companies charge their customers. There are also service companies that flat rate their services. Either way, you pay, you want the service and troubleshooting done in a quick and efficient manner with a guarantee. Do your research before selecting a company to provide reliable, honest service to your home. If you know what the problem is then the company can likely give you an estimate over the phone. Some will while some do not. Why? Because they likely want to verify the problem to make sure it is a correct assessment. It can be a complex issue and what you think it is it may not be the problem. So you can expect to pay for a service call and troubleshooting charge. Most HVAC service companies do not give free estimates on repairs.
Ductwork pinging or popping. If you hear a pinging or popping sound coming from metal ductwork, this may be caused by thermal expansion or by air blowing past a loose flap of metal. Track along the duct runs, listening for the sound. If you find it, make a small dent in the sheet metal to provide a more rigid surface that’s less likely to move as it heats and cools.
I have a recurring problem of having to have freon added to my A/C system. I have even replaced both units inside and outside but seem to have the same problem. I believe that it must be in the lines between the outside and inside. Is there anything that can be put into the lines to seal any leaks if this is the problem? If not is it advised that the lines be replaced?
MacDonald-Miller has developed a unique program to help the Service Department continually evaluate the satisfaction of customers and make ongoing improvements to the level of service provided. Our Customer Experience Commitment encompasses the following elements that help maintain and increase the quality of service delivered by the MacMiller team.
Our experienced technicians know how best to repair and maintain an HVAC system, keeping your family safe and your system running efficiently. Our team can also identify potential problems, addressing them before they cause serious damage to your system. Instead of attempting a repair yourself, have one of Brubaker Inc.’s trained technicians look at your system for you.
How often you should clean your air ducts depends on your situation. If you or someone in the home has asthma or is acutely allergic to certain airborne materials or pollen, regular duct cleaning may be helpful. The Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have an official position on the necessity of air duct cleaning unless the ducts have been contaminated by rodents, insects or mold, or you are aware of particles blowing out through the vents. The EPA recommends you have your air ducts cleaned on an as-needed basis. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) suggests having air ducts cleaned every three to five years.
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You should also have air ducts cleaned after recent water contamination or water damage to prevent mold; after renovations or remodeling to ensure debris and dust didn’t settle in the vents and ducts; if you are having problems with allergies or asthma; or when you are moving into a newly purchased home, especially if the previous owners smoked or had pets. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) recommends getting your air ducts cleaned every three to five years, or every two to three years in regions where homeowners use their air conditioning and heater for many months of the year, while the EPA suggests homeowners have duct cleaning done as needed.
Once a diagnosis is made to your air-conditioning and/or heating system, the unit can be repaired, in most situations, with stock HVAC parts off the truck. Sometimes the HVAC part has to be ordered because it is a specialty part that only the HVAC manufacturer of your equipment can provide. If the part can be picked up locally then you can expect to pay for travel time to and from the HVAC parts dealer. It is practically impossible to carry every single HVAC part for every single HVAC breakdown that occurs.
Believe it or not, the evaporator coils inside the AHU (Air Handling Unit) are freezing. You may notice the refrigerant lines on the condenser or at the AHU are frozen with ice build-up. The frost or ice builds up on the evaporator coils and blocks air flow (low air flow and no cooling are a sign of a low charge). A low refrigerant charge will cause the evaporator coil to operate at or below freezing. Since the coil typically operates below the dew point, it draws condensation out of the air. When the evaporator coil begins operating below freezing all this condensation freezes to the evaporator coil and the unit stops cooling.
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
Modern air conditioning emerged from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, and the first large-scale electrical air conditioning was invented and used in 1902 by England inventor Willis Carrier. The introduction of residential air conditioning in the 1920s helped enable the great migration to the Sun Belt in the United States.[citation needed]
Heat pumps and electric furnaces usually have steam humidifiers to increase output. They are line voltage powered and must be unplugged or disconnected before servicing to avoid injury. With the exception of some mist type humidifiers, all have a reservoir. Stagnant water sitting in the reservoir during the off season can be a breeding ground for bacteria. Turn the water off and clean the humidifier if possible when heating season has ended.
Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.
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