Denver HVAC Repair

Air conditioning and refrigeration are provided through the removal of heat. Heat can be removed through radiation, convection, or conduction. Refrigeration conduction media such as water, air, ice, and chemicals are referred to as refrigerants. A refrigerant is employed either in a heat pump system in which a compressor is used to drive thermodynamic refrigeration cycle, or in a free cooling system which uses pumps to circulate a cool refrigerant (typically water or a glycol mix).
The condenser fan moves air across the coil to increase the transfer of heat. It is critical to the system. Obstructing the flow of air will not only reduce efficiency, but can lead to compressor failure. Keep debris and objects away from the coil and fan to allow maximum air flow. Some condenser fan motors have sealed bearings, others need lubrication. Damage to the fan can occur if removed improperly. Have a qualified serviceman handle the lubricating if needed.
Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.
1) Your air conditioner is not working at all. Before calling in a professional to address this issue, you may want to check a few things yourself. Check to see if your thermostat is set to “cool”. Confirm that your designated cooling temperature is less than the temperature of the room or home. If everything is set correctly, check the electrical panel to be sure you do not have a tripped breaker. If these things all check out and your air condition unit is still not working, it is time to call in a professional.
The condenser fan moves air across the coil to increase the transfer of heat. It is critical to the system. Obstructing the flow of air will not only reduce efficiency, but can lead to compressor failure. Keep debris and objects away from the coil and fan to allow maximum air flow. Some condenser fan motors have sealed bearings, others need lubrication. Damage to the fan can occur if removed improperly. Have a qualified serviceman handle the lubricating if needed.

Focus first on sealing ducts that run through the attic, crawlspace, unheated basement, or garage. Use duct sealant (mastic) or metal-backed (foil) tape to seal the seams and connections of ducts. After sealing the ducts in those spaces, wrap them in insulation to keep them from getting hot in the summer or cold in the winter. Next, look to seal any other ducts that you can access in the heated or cooled part of the house. See our Duct Sealing Fact Sheet (787KB) for more information.
If the air conditioner on your thermostat set low, and you aren't feeling cool air, it could be that debris is blocking the condenser. Check on your system outside and remove any tree branches or leaves from around it. Debris can easily obstruct air flow, so make sure the area around your air conditioning unit is clean and trimmed back. Make sure your filter is clean. A buildup of dirt and dust can cause poor air circulation.
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.
Replacement of air filters: dirty filters can lower your unit’s efficiency and cause damage. You can perform monthly checks and cleanings yourself. If your AC is in constant use, you’ll need to replace the filters once per month to keep the unit running properly. Filters typically cost $15-$60. Some filters are reusable, and only need regular cleaning.
In addition to the information below, see these two articles for the general care and maintenance of your air conditioner: Preparing Your Air Conditioner for Summer and How to Replace Furnace & AC Filters. Most noteworthy, you should replace the filters at least twice a year, before the heating and cooling seasons. For information on furnace problems, please see Furnace Not Working.

In the fall you should prepare your HVAC unit for winter. Turn off your air conditioner’s circuit, then hose it off to remove debris. It must dry completely. Do this when it’s warm enough that there’s no risk of the water freezing. Cover the exposed pipes with foam pipe insulation ($1-$3), and protect your entire unit with a weatherproof cover ($20-$50).
A mini-split system typically supplies air conditioned and heated air to a single or a few rooms of a building.[38] Multi-zone systems are a common application of ductless systems and allow up to 8 rooms (zones) to be conditioned from a single outdoor unit. Multi-zone systems typically offer a variety of indoor unit styles including wall-mounted, ceiling-mounted, ceiling recessed, and horizontal ducted. Mini-split systems typically produce 9,000 to 36,000 Btu (9,500–38,000 kJ) per hour of cooling. Multi-zone systems provide extended cooling and heating capacity up to 60,000 Btu's.
As an Atlanta resident, you’re well aware that the weather in our area can go through extremes of both hot and cold throughout the year, taxing your heating and cooling system to its limits. You’ll likely encounter the need for repair or replacement at some point. If you need HVAC installation, HVAC maintenance, or HVAC service and repair, R.S. Andrews is the most trusted name in Atlanta.
Alberto said they were busy but could either install on the upcoming Saturday.  We were going to be out of town and said unfortunately that day did not work.  He then proposed the upcoming Tuesday as a possible solution, but just had to confirm with another appointment.  I said great.  I will review the estimate and call your office to confirm I want to move forward with the install.

The installment team ARS made numerous attempts to correct the issue over the last several months. They have not found the issue on why my 2018 outside unit and inside unit (4 ton unit) is not cooling the house down. I had the unit for 1 year and in the months of July and August the Nest unit reads 90 degrees from 12 noon to 7pm. My wife and I are very upset with the upgrade unit we purchase from Home Depot.
Hi. I hope someone can help me. I have a has water heater amd it seems to only work when it wants to. Regardless of amount of use some days I have got water and some days it runs out of hot water immediately even if it hasn't been used all day. And some days it runs out half way through a shower. I have already turned the temperature almost all the way up and nothing is helping. Is there a way too fix this or is it time for a replacement?
6) Check your ductwork and seal open spaces. Make sure all your doors and windows are properly sealed to help keep your home cool. Perform a visual inspection of your ductwork occasionally to be sure it is sealed correctly. If ductwork is not properly sealed, cool air will escape before getting into your home. The less cool air that escapes your home, the less your unit will have to work.
The employees were on time, professional, and extremely thorough while addressing a particularly difficult situation. The entire time Saul, the supervisor of the team, kept me informed, and educated me about any process that I may have not completely understood. The team was courteous to the residents they encountered, and made sure not to leave evidence that they had even been there. Great job!
HVAC.com has some very comprehensive resources available to aid homeowners like you in times of AC repair crisis. Using the resources below, you can work to protect your cooling system from breakdown, better understand what types of AC repairs you may face, know what to do in emergency situations, and know how to find a trusted AC repair company when you need them.
Before you reach out to local HVAC companies, jot down a few notes. Know the model of your unit and see if it’s under warranty. If so, call the manufacturer first. Then, get multiple quotes for the project in question. Never get less than two quotes for any home remodeling project. Once received, compare all and make sure all include the same work. Check referrals and certifications before making a final decision.
I could not have been more pleased with the responsiveness, considerate employees, workmanship, and follow up. We used three divisions of Bill Howe when we had a flood due to a water heater/T&P gauge, Plumbing, Remediation and Reconstruction. It was timely, reasonably priced and finished with attention to detail. Ashley in the office was always polite and responsive and we could not have been happier under the circumstances.
We’re located in Lexington and service the surrounding area, so stop on by if you’re looking for a new furnace or want to set up an appointment to have one of our techs do a consultation at your home and help you figure out which system is ideal for your home. Schedule furnace repair or a furnace service appointment with James Heating & A/C, Inc using our online scheduler, or if you need help more quickly, give us a buzz at 336-853-6070. 
A contactor is a $25 mechanical relay that uses low-voltage power from the thermostat to switch 220-volt high-amperage current to the compressor and condenser fan. AC contactors can wear out and are at the top of the list of common air conditioning service failures. Even if your contactor is working, it pays to replace it every five years or so. Unscrew the old contactor before removing the wires. Then move the wires to the new unit (photo 6).
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