Denver HVAC Repair

If you ever need a repair or maintenance preformed on your Trane air conditioning and heating equipment, we hope you’ll give R.S. Andrews a chance to earn your business. Literally tens of thousands of homeowners have called our hotline for repairs. While you can’t please everyone, we try and have done so in over 99% of the services calls we have performed. It’s a high standard equaled by the quality of Trane air conditioners, furnaces and heat pumps. Call now for service and repair. And don’t forget that we provide plumbing and electrical service and repair, too.


An air conditioner’s cooling process produces condensation, which normally flows away from the equipment, causing no problem. If there is a clog in the condensate drain lines or drip pan, or if outdoor humidity levels are high, moisture may back up into your air conditioner. Excess condensation will increase indoor humidity levels and hinder the air conditioner’s performance. It could also cause damage to your air conditioner’s components.
In the United States, HVAC engineers generally are members of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), EPA Universal CFC certified (for installation and service of CFC HVAC devices), or locally engineer certified such as a Special to Chief Boilers License issued by the state or, in some jurisdictions, the city. ASHRAE is an international technical society for all individuals and organizations interested in HVAC. The Society, organized into regions, chapters, and student branches, allows exchange of HVAC knowledge and experiences for the benefit of the field's practitioners and the public. ASHRAE provides many opportunities to participate in the development of new knowledge via, for example, research and its many technical committees. These committees typically meet twice per year at the ASHRAE Annual and Winter Meetings. A popular product show, the AHR Expo, is held in conjunction with each winter meeting. The Society has approximately 50,000 members and has headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia.
The myth that most people believe is that if you add more refrigerant to the unit it will cool better. This is only true if the evaporator coil is operating below freezing. The unit must have a balanced charge at the correct refrigerant pressure for the temperature and usually, only an HVAC professional can charge your unit properly. Another misconception about refrigerant is that the unit burns it up and it must be replaced from time to time. This is not true. Furthermore, the refrigerant loop is a closed system and barring any leaks the air conditioning system should never need any refrigerant.
The summers here in Alexandria can range from almost pleasant to downright brutal. And you know as well as we do that it’s those latter days when your central AC or heat pump will decide to go down! But you needn’t seek solace at the Waterfront or over at Cameron Run Regional Park. The secret to restoring your comfort lies with the certified specialists at HVAC Unlimited!

ABM (NYSE: ABM) is a leading provider of facility solutions with revenues of approximately $5.5 billion and more than 130,000 employees in 350+ offices throughout the United States and various international locations. ABM's comprehensive capabilities include janitorial, electrical & lighting, energy solutions, facilities engineering, HVAC & mechanical, landscape & turf, mission critical solutions and parking, provided through stand-alone or integrated solutions. ABM provides custom facility solutions in urban, suburban and rural areas to properties of all sizes - from schools and commercial buildings to hospitals, data centers, manufacturing plants and airports. ABM Industries Incorporated, which operates through its subsidiaries, was founded in 1909. For more information, visit www.abm.com.
Please note: this is a review from someone who never got service from here. They just chose to ignore my calls for a heating emergency. Who knows, they might have give great service, if they actually return a promised phone call. I actually call them this past Saturday night. It was chilly, we turned the furnace on...... Poof.... Nothing. So, I look them up on Yelp. Good reviews with a few bad goods added, plus a Yelp deal. I gave them a call, the at about 6 pm. I know, 6pm on a Saturday, who's going to come out, well, they did. They woman, I assume their receptionist, answers and I told her I need someone out here. She assured me someone will call me back in 15 mins. Half hour to 45 mins later, no calls from them. I figured maybe they wrote the number down wrong, it happens. So, I called them again. They got the number correct, got my name and address correct, and was told they will call me back in 10 mins. I even asked if this is something they don't do, as in services on a Saturday night. I was told by the receptionist that they do and I would just be ok calling another company if they is not part of their services. They again assured me someone WILL call me in 10 mins. Well, unless their definition of 10 mins is never, then they got it wrong as I am still waiting to be called 5 days later.
Air-source heat pumps are more popular in milder winter climates where the temperature is frequently in the range of 4–13 °C (40–55 °F), because heat pumps become inefficient in more extreme cold. This is because ice forms on the outdoor unit's heat exchanger coil, which blocks air flow over the coil. To compensate for this, the heat pump system must temporarily switch back into the regular air conditioning mode to switch the outdoor evaporator coil back to being the condenser coil, so that it can heat up and defrost. A heat pump system will therefore have a form of electric resistance heating in the indoor air path that is activated only in this mode in order to compensate for the temporary indoor air cooling, which would otherwise be uncomfortable in the winter.
After my initial meeting with HVAC Service I had really high hopes and thought these guys were going to be my HVAC go to company. However, it did not pan out this way whatsoever. Initial estimate meeting - This was the initial meeting I thought I found the go to company. Alberto was friendly, punctual, and knowledgeable. I asked some very basic questions and Alberto was able to explain the why's and why not's of each of my questions. Overall I felt really comfortable with Alberto and was extremely impressed. Then it goes all downhill..... Alberto said they were busy but could either install on the upcoming Saturday. We were going to be out of town and said unfortunately that day did not work. He then proposed the upcoming Tuesday as a possible solution, but just had to confirm with another appointment. I said great. I will review the estimate and call your office to confirm I want to move forward with the install. Within 1-hour of Alberto leaving (probably more like 30 minutes) I called the office to confirm I wanted to move forward with the install and to please confirm that Tuesday will be the install day. The lady on the phone said that she will get in touch with Alberto and call me back. This was on a Friday. On Monday I had not received a call from HVAC Service so I called to follow up. The lady on the phone said they were not able to secure a crane for Tuesday and that the install would not be taking place. Fine, no problem I understand. Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all. I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed. You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything. She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane. I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update. Surprise, surprise, no phone call. I call to follow up at the end of the next day and she said that she has not been able to get in touch with the owner. By this time, I am starting to get frustrated because I am starting to get the run around. I question her if I am even on the schedule or if they attempted to schedule a crane. She says they are extremely busy and that she does not know. So I say, basically I have waited over 2 weeks and you have not put me on the schedule and I am at the end of the install line. No answer. I tell her to talk to her boss and find out what is happening, and I will think about what direction I want to move in at this point. Monday the following week, no phone calls, or follow up. I call to get an update and am told that they cannot install my system because they don't have time. I ask what does that mean, one year? One week? Until the end of summer they say. What does that mean I ask? They say at the end of September. I say thank you for wasting 1 month of my time. How could they have served me better without serving me? 1. Be honest and let me know as soon as possible that the install was going to be delayed and probably not happen until the end of summer. Don't waste a month of my time. I could have reached out to a different company in the time I was waiting for them. 2. Communicate! the thing that upsets me the most is I was the one making all the calls to them. Not once did they ever call me to say we have not forgot about you, or this is what is happening. 3. Provide recommendations on other contractors who could have helped me once they realized they were too busy. I am pretty disappointed it came to this review because I really liked this company and wanted to do work with them. It is a family run business, and reminded me of the HVAC business my dad owned. Beware once you are the one that has to start calling them for updates, or to follow up; your time is probably best served by calling a different contractor.
The use of furnaces, space heaters, and boilers as a method of indoor heating could result in incomplete combustion and the emission of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and other combustion byproducts. Incomplete combustion occurs when there is insufficient oxygen; the inputs are fuels containing various contaminants and the outputs are harmful byproducts, most dangerously carbon monoxide, which is a tasteless and odorless gas with serious adverse health effects.[14]
Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.
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