Denver HVAC Repair

Poorly maintained water cooling towers can promote the growth and spread of microorganisms,[55] such as Legionella pneumophila, the infectious agent responsible for Legionnaires' disease, or thermophilic actinomycetes. As long as the cooling tower is kept clean (usually by means of a chlorine treatment), these health hazards can be avoided or reduced. Excessive air conditioning can have a negative effect on skin, causing it to dry out, and can also cause dehydration.[citation needed]
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Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
Was not satisifed with this company.  This person came out and took 10 minutes only to tell me that my unit would not last for a year and that I needed to have it replaced!  I'm not sure if he was very knowlegable or if he was just plain lazy and do not even try to fix the problem.  He just wanted to install a brand new system because he was both and of course, that's much more money for him!
HVAC.com is the top heating and air conditioning resource site in the world! As you search for a contractor, check out our Resource Center and the HVAC.com Blog to find answers to any heating, air conditioning, or indoor air quality question. Learn about the types of systems used in homes and businesses, how to vet contractors, and more which will best prepare you for working with the pros you’ll find through our directory.
Should you experience a system breakdown, know that there are a few common causes of summer AC repairs. Below you’ll find a few of the most common ones AC repair technicians face each day throughout the warmer months. Having a better understanding of the troubles your system may face can help you feel more at ease with the AC repair process, and better comprehend the information given to you by your technician.
I called HVAC on a Saturday morning to come and look at the A/C. The woman answering the phone told… I called HVAC on a Saturday morning to come and look at the A/C. The woman answering the phone told me that she would call the technician and call me back with a service window of when he would be there.  Hours later, she still hadn't called back. When I called back to follow up, the new lady answering the phone told me the original woman had given me miss information. They were a call center and could only text the technician (who of course was supposed to be hadn't called me back)! She texted him again and when he finally called back, he told me I'd have to make an appointment for Tuesday! What's the point of after-hours emergency A/C service if I have to wait until three days later and have them come during normal business hours?! Unbelievably poor service! Read more
Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all.  I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed.    You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything.  She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane.  I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update.  Surprise, surprise, no phone call.  
Service Experts Heating and Air Conditioning was founded with the understanding of offering customers with the most excellent heating and cooling practices in the industry. Since it started, Service Experts in Longmont has been faithful to community, providing the first class HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning) products and services in the area. If you are interested in more details about your local HVAC leaders, simply dial us at 303-647-5749 or schedule an appointment with us online.
We moved into a new home and had issues with the heating ducts in one of the rooms. We called HVAC based on other yelp reviews. Overall, everyone we dealt with were friendly, professional and knowledgeable: From the people on the phone managing the schedule to the those performing the work in our house. The day before the scheduled work we asked if additional work could be done (clothes dryer duct cleaning), which they were able to accommodate. The people working at the house were on time, very polite, took great care to keep the house clean during the entire job and explained everything when they were finished. I will certainly use HVAC again.
If your air ducts have been damaged, you’ll need to replace them. The national average air duct replacement cost is $150-$280, which may not include materials. Factors such as duct material, labor, location of ducts and linear feet of ductwork will all affect your final costs. Labor costs will vary based on how accessible the ducts are and what material your ducts are made of. The least expensive duct material is a flexible, non-metallic ducting that costs approximately $1-$2 per linear foot. Flexible aluminum is generally more expensive and stronger than non-metallic ducting. Stainless steel ducting is the strongest, the least flexible (meaning installing it typically has higher labor rates), and usually the most expensive. An average price for air duct replacement could range between $35 and $55 per linear foot, including basic materials and labor. A typical single-family home has 6-10 duct runs; replacing or installing one duct run could average $150-$250 for labor.
Focus first on sealing ducts that run through the attic, crawlspace, unheated basement, or garage. Use duct sealant (mastic) or metal-backed (foil) tape to seal the seams and connections of ducts. After sealing the ducts in those spaces, wrap them in insulation to keep them from getting hot in the summer or cold in the winter. Next, look to seal any other ducts that you can access in the heated or cooled part of the house. See our Duct Sealing Fact Sheet (787KB) for more information.
Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
Replacing a capacitor is easy. Just take a photo of the wires before disconnecting anything (you may need a reference later on). Then discharge the stored energy in the old capacitor (Photo 4). Use needle-nose pliers to pluck one wire at a time from the old capacitor and snap it onto the corresponding tab of the new capacitor. The female crimp connectors should snap tightly onto the capacitor tabs. Wiggle each connector to see if it’s tight. If it’s not, remove the connector and bend the rounded edges of it so it makes a tighter fit on the tab. When you’ve swapped all the wires, secure the new capacitor (Photo 5).
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