Denver HVAC Repair

Just like running a marathon, we perform better at full strength. If we’re not feeling great, it’s that much harder to finish the race. Similarly, when you set your thermostat to a certain temperature, the system is tasked with maintaining that temperature throughout the room. Working at full strength, the system can easily maintain that temperature (as long as it’s not below 60 degrees or above 80 degrees). However, when injured, the system may struggle to keep the room at your desired temperature. As such, it’s working harder, which means higher utility bills.
Because an air conditioner moves heat between the indoor coil and the outdoor coil, both must be kept clean. This means that, in addition to replacing the air filter at the evaporator coil, it is also necessary to regularly clean the condenser coil. Failure to keep the condenser clean will eventually result in harm to the compressor, because the condenser coil is responsible for discharging both the indoor heat (as picked up by the evaporator) and the heat generated by the electric motor driving the compressor.
"Customer service was great, and the price was in-line with other places, and fast service. We had a whole replacement of the outside and inside. I would have liked to see a better install for the furnace and new thermostat - the new thermostat should have gone where the old one was, and even tho the new furnace was a tight fit, they didn't offer to come back and repair the case molding, or give me a discount on the damage done, and I believe they should have put a disconnect box on the outside of the home, to make it easier for any future repairs needed. Other than that, am very happy with the cooling and heating!"

If the AC doesn’t turn off, it may be time to clean the condensing unit. Dirty condenser coils won’t give off heat efficiently and will keep the unit running.  Another possibility: The contacts on the outdoor run relay may have welded together—something that can happen over time because of frequent electrical arcing at the relay. Before checking the run relay, turn off the power to the furnace and the condensing unit. Next, disassemble the relay and pry apart the contacts. This should do the trick until you buy a replacement—which you should do soon.


An air conditioner’s cooling process produces condensation, which normally flows away from the equipment, causing no problem. If there is a clog in the condensate drain lines or drip pan, or if outdoor humidity levels are high, moisture may back up into your air conditioner. Excess condensation will increase indoor humidity levels and hinder the air conditioner’s performance. It could also cause damage to your air conditioner’s components.

If so, you may want to consider replacing your entire AC system. After your AC system reaches a certain age, it makes more sense to invest in a new AC system altogether rather than repairing it one piece at a time. To learn more about John Moore’s AC replacement program, our warranty, and the cost-advantages of replacing your AC system, visit our AC Replacement page.


While it should be rare to have problems occur with new equipment, it does happen. When it does, you want a good troubleshooter who is knowledgeable and can make the diagnosis and repair in a timely and efficient manner. That means you want that HVAC contractor who sends their technicians to HVAC technical seminars and factory sponsored training classes. That can make the difference between solving the problem quickly and efficiently in hours or being frustrated waiting days or weeks to have the problem solved. Take the time to choose your contractor wisely and it will save you a lot of heartache and frustration.

I called HVAC on a Saturday morning to come and look at the A/C. The woman answering the phone told… I called HVAC on a Saturday morning to come and look at the A/C. The woman answering the phone told me that she would call the technician and call me back with a service window of when he would be there.  Hours later, she still hadn't called back. When I called back to follow up, the new lady answering the phone told me the original woman had given me miss information. They were a call center and could only text the technician (who of course was supposed to be hadn't called me back)! She texted him again and when he finally called back, he told me I'd have to make an appointment for Tuesday! What's the point of after-hours emergency A/C service if I have to wait until three days later and have them come during normal business hours?! Unbelievably poor service! Read more


Our technicians have experience repairing furnaces and will make sure your home is back to keeping you comfortable in no time. From training and certifications to our reputation for getting the job done right time and time again, you can be sure that Van Haaften Plumbing & Heating’s furnace repair technicians will have your troubles taken care of and your furnace running smoothly. Whether it’s emergency furnace repair or service you can schedule some time in advance, our team can provide you peace of mind, knowing that your furnace is in skilled hands. Need a furnace repair? When performing a repair, it's vital to source professional HVAC contractors.
Beyond changing the air filter on a regular basis, one of the best ways to ensure your home's HVAC system is operating at peak efficiency is to have a qualified professional HVAC contractor tune up the system on a biannual basis. Energy Star recommends scheduling your system tune-up around the beginning of daylight savings time in the fall and its end in the spring. It's an easy way to remember to have your system serviced before the peak heating and cooling seasons. A standard tune-up is likely to cost you between $70 and $100, but it's money well spent. 
Before we get into the different AC repairs and replacements that John Moore offers, it’s important to understand the basic operating principles of your AC system. There are two types of systems: electric and natural gas. Electric AC systems use an air handler to blow air through your home while natural gas systems use a furnace. Both furnaces and air handlers are typically located in the attic.
Designed to improve manufacturing process control in a printing plant, Carrier's invention controlled not only temperature but also humidity. Carrier used his knowledge of the heating of objects with steam and reversed the process. Instead of sending air through hot coils, he sent it through cold coils (filled with cold water). The air was cooled, and thereby the amount of moisture in the air could be controlled, which in turn made the humidity in the room controllable. The controlled temperature and humidity helped maintain consistent paper dimensions and ink alignment. Later, Carrier's technology was applied to increase productivity in the workplace, and The Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America was formed to meet rising demand. Over time, air conditioning came to be used to improve comfort in homes and automobiles as well. Residential sales expanded dramatically in the 1950s.[citation needed]
Changing your central air conditioning unit's air filter at least once every six months will not only help you save on your monthly bills but also will help extend the life of your system. Changing the filter every three months is even better. All the air in your home circulates and recirculates through the same filter attached to your indoor unit. Designed to remove dust particles to keep the air you breathe clean, filters become clogged, causing your air conditioning and heating system to work less efficiently and costing you more to operate it. If left unchanged long enough, your system could fail completely.
If you believe that the ac not working or you’re getting little or no cold air, check these three things first. Make sure all the registers in the house are wide open. Then be sure the furnace filter is clean. Then go outside and clean off the condenser coils (Photo 2). If several registers were closed or the filter was clogged, the reduced airflow could have caused the evaporator coil to ice up and stop cooling your home. If you’ve changed the filter and opened all the registers and you’re still not getting airflow at the registers, deice the A-coil. Move the thermostat mode switch from “Cooling” to “Off” and move the fan switch from “Auto” to “On.” Let the blower run for at least 30 minutes or until there’s good airflow at the registers. Then turn the AC back on to test it. If it works for the next 12 hours, you’ve solved the problem.
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