Denver HVAC Repair

Commercial HVAC equipment is complex, and necessary for running a commercial building. When you call Apex Energy, Inc. for commercial heating and cooling repairs, maintenance, and installations, you won’t be disappointed. We’re proud to serve residents of Willowbrook, IL. We employ knowledgeable, dependable, and qualified HVAC technicians, so you can feel confident in our services. Call today to learn more or to schedule your next appointment!
Finally, air conditioning and heating maintenance, provided on a regular schedule, can prevent many air conditioner or heater breakdowns thereby preventing the need for you to call an air conditioning and heating repair person for central air conditioning troubleshooting. Maintenance can save you lots of money in the long run but even so, problems can still occur.
At James Heating & A/C, Inc, heating and cooling isn’t just our job, it’s our passion. We strive to provide you with high quality HVAC service in Lexington. No matter the size of the problem or time of day, you can count on us to get the job done properly. After all, James Heating & A/C, Inc has been working in the community since 1967, bringing comfort to our customers right when they need it.
Perhaps the most sensible way to cool your home is to use your home's heating apparatus. Heat pumps can work in exactly this fashion. This device exchanges warmer and cooler air particles between your home and the outside air, allowing you to create a comfortable environment inside your home without the need of generating your own source of heat and cold. The one major drawback of heat pumps is that they tend to be inadequate in extremely cold or hot temperatures, which Portland essentially never sees. The only reason many homeowners don't have heat pumps in their homes is that they already have a forced air heating system. Thus, the best time to install air conditioning for your home is when your heating system fails.
An improperly maintained heating and air conditioning is an inefficient heating and air conditioning system. That’s why we provide appointments for annual inspections with our licensed technicians. It’s our goal to make sure that your home is as comfortable and energy-efficient as possible. For inspections, repairs, and service, contact BGE HOME for quality service.
The condenser fan is another important HVAC element that must be maintained. Condenser fans that contain oil ports should be lubricated at least annually. The outside condenser should also be shielded from direct sunlight if possible. Keeping vegetation at least two feet away from outdoor HVAC units will also promote higher performance and potentially lower energy bills due to higher efficiency. The further away vegetation is, the better an HVAC unit will operate. 
We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
Air conditioners can create a lot of water because they remove moisture from the air. To get rid of this, they have a [usually plastic] drain pipe that comes out of the side of the air handler. Over time, algae can block this pipe and, when it does, the AC won’t work. In fact, some condensate drains have a float switch that won’t let the AC run if water backs-up. Water can also puddle around the unit or flood the area. To deal with condensate problems, please see Air Conditioner Leaks Water, below.
In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids (such as alcohol and ether) could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to speed up the evaporation. They lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to −14 °C (7 °F) while the ambient temperature was 18 °C (64 °F). Franklin noted that, soon after they passed the freezing point of water 0 °C (32 °F), a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about 6 mm (1⁄4 in) thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching −14 °C (7 °F). Franklin concluded: "From this experiment one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day."[9]

Window unit air conditioners are installed in an open window. The interior air is cooled as a fan blows it over the evaporator. On the exterior the heat drawn from the interior is dissipated into the environment as a second fan blows outside air over the condenser. A large house or building may have several such units, allowing each room to be cooled separately.

Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.
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