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Modern air conditioning emerged from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, and the first large-scale electrical air conditioning was invented and used in 1902 by England inventor Willis Carrier. The introduction of residential air conditioning in the 1920s helped enable the great migration to the Sun Belt in the United States.[citation needed]

Air conditioning can also be provided by a process called free cooling which uses pumps to circulate a coolant (typically water or a glycol mix) from a cold source, which in turn acts as a heat sink for the energy that is removed from the cooled space. Common storage media are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter boreholes, equipped with heat exchanger. Some systems with small storage capacity are hybrid systems, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added because the temperature of the storage gradually increases during the cooling season, thereby declining its effectiveness.


Here’s a simple test to try on your own: When it’s hotter than 80 degrees outside, turn on your AC unit, and set it to well below room temperature. Let it run for 15 minutes, then use a thermometer to check just outside the return duct (the area where air flows in to be cooled). Now take a temperature reading just outside the strongest, most easily accessible vent (where cool air should be flowing out). Subtract the second reading from the first. If the difference between these two is fewer than 14 degrees, your HVAC unit might need work. 
American design standards are legislated in the Uniform Mechanical Code or International Mechanical Code. In certain states, counties, or cities, either of these codes may be adopted and amended via various legislative processes. These codes are updated and published by the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials (IAPMO) or the International Code Council (ICC) respectively, on a 3-year code development cycle. Typically, local building permit departments are charged with enforcement of these standards on private and certain public properties.
Allow our experts to help with any of your heating and cooling needs or questions. Our wide array of expertise and background will benefit you and your home, whether you are considering a replacement system or evaluating your whole system to check for areas of improvement. We can help you reach your optimum indoor comfort. Give us a ring at 866-397-3787 or request an appointment online.
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