Denver HVAC Repair

When we’re in a customer’s home, we’re always on the lookout for things we can do to help them out and put a smile on their face. It could be as simple as changing a lightbulb or as involved as cleaning gutters, listing a car for sale online, or repairing a broken gate. There’s no limit to what we might do, and of course, there’s never any charge to help out. It’s good deeds for FREE!
Our A/C was blowing hot air intermittently...it was cold one minute and warm the next. By 8pm I'd have a 90 degree interior temp. After one company just took a cursory glance at our A/C and found nothing wrong, I called HVAC. I called them mostly based on Michael W's post on 8/10/14 where he told us the owner, Alberto, took his feedback and took it SERIOUSLY. That speaks VOLUMES to anyone who has been around long enough to know the characteristics of the serious players are and those who are the wannabes. So HVAC sent Tony Diaz to my house. I was at work so he was subjected to the most excruciatingly exacting woman on the planet (my wife). Tony impressed her with his friendliness, professionalism and the obvious jouneyman-level knowledge of his craft. He found literally --burnt-out-- parts in our system and replaced them. It cost us a bit but I know enough about the parts to see there was no gouging on the parts and a fair rate for the labor. It wasn't cheap but it was fair and worth every dime. And now i have A/C in my house again and a repairman came to my house, actually FIXED something AND managed to do so in a friendly & professional manner. That used to be commonplace...nowadays it deserves a "Wow".. Thank you, Tony!
R22 (also known as HCFC-22) has a global warming potential about 1,800 times higher than CO2.[61] It was phased out for use in new equipment by 2010, and is to be completely discontinued by 2020. Although these gasses can be recycled when air conditioning units are disposed of, uncontrolled dumping and leaking can release gas directly into the atmosphere.

“Robinson Air = top notch professionals. Mike was personable, knowledgeable, timely, thorough, and left me with a hard copy of prioritized recommendations and his explanations of HVAC needs I may have in the future. I was very impressed with being shown a tablet picture of a possible problem. It was so refreshing to have the service and all phone interactions handled so well and smoothly…thank you for taking the “angst” out of this kind of service call. My hat is off to you and I will happily recommend you to family and friends. Thank you!!!”
Waited a week for technician who showed up for less than 15 minutes and told me that my air filters were dirty and I needed to experiment with thermostats to be comfortable. Thermostat shows temp at 75 when set on 71. Did what he instructed and still had problems when I realized unit was short cycling. When I called technician he told me I would have to place a new request for service. He gave me the office number and hung up on me. By the time I called office he had called in and said he refused to come back out. The operator would not give me business owners name and could not tell me why technician refused to return although they did say they would refund the fee for service call. Telephone rep yelled at me.

How often you should clean your air ducts depends on your situation. If you or someone in the home has asthma or is acutely allergic to certain airborne materials or pollen, regular duct cleaning may be helpful. The Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have an official position on the necessity of air duct cleaning unless the ducts have been contaminated by rodents, insects or mold, or you are aware of particles blowing out through the vents. The EPA recommends you have your air ducts cleaned on an as-needed basis. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) suggests having air ducts cleaned every three to five years.

Are there watermarks on your ceiling? Visible leaks around your outdoor unit? Has your AC system completely stopped working? If you notice any of these signs, it’s in your best interest to call an AC technician to fix the issue before it causes more problems for you, your AC system, and your home. To learn more about potential AC malfunctions and how we fix AC issues, visit our AC Repair page.
Free cooling systems can have very high efficiencies, and are sometimes combined with seasonal thermal energy storage so that the cold of winter can be used for summer air conditioning. Common storage mediums are deep aquifers or a natural underground rock mass accessed via a cluster of small-diameter, heat-exchanger-equipped boreholes. Some systems with small storages are hybrids, using free cooling early in the cooling season, and later employing a heat pump to chill the circulation coming from the storage. The heat pump is added-in because the storage acts as a heat sink when the system is in cooling (as opposed to charging) mode, causing the temperature to gradually increase during the cooling season.

Replacing your old heating and cooling equipment with new, energy-efficient models is a great start. But to make sure that you get the best performance, the new equipment must be properly installed. In fact, improper installation can reduce system efficiency by up to 30 percent - costing you more on your utility bills and possibly shortening the equipment's life. Learn more.


Every Trane is tested to withstand the harshest conditions nature or our engineers can throw at it – like freezing conditions in our System Extreme Environmental Test (SEET) lab or five-inches of water an hour in our Climate Chamber. That's how we get heating and cooling systems you can count on to run through anything. And when it's time for a tune-up, our dealers and certified Trane Comfort Specialists™ are always at your service right when you need them. It's that kind of reliability that's earned us the positions of America's Most Trusted HVAC System*.
An air conditioning system, or a standalone air conditioner, provides cooling and humidity control for all or part of a building. Air conditioned buildings often have sealed windows, because open windows would work against the system intended to maintain constant indoor air conditions. Outside, fresh air is generally drawn into the system by a vent into the indoor heat exchanger section, creating positive air pressure. The percentage of return air made up of fresh air can usually be manipulated by adjusting the opening of this vent. Typical fresh air intake is about 10%.
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all technicians who open a system containing a controlled refrigerant be certified to do so. There are four levels of certification, one of which is a “universal” certification to allow the HVAC technician to work on any type of equipment containing refrigerant. Your HVAC technician should be certified as “Level II Certified” at a minimum or, preferably, “Universal Certification” to work on your central air conditioner. Obtaining this certification information from your professional HVAC technician may be required in the event you are working with a realtor to sell your home. Costs for certification average $40-$240.
Regardless of the scope of your project, find out what you need to do to prepare your home for their visit. For example, the HVAC professional will need access to the areas in question and may need access to other mechanical or ventilation points. Make sure pets and children are kept out of the way. Ask if your project will involve removing dry wall or making any other structural changes – you may need to hire a professional drywall contractor to patch up HVAC work. If you are adding a unit that may contribute to carbon monoxide within the home, find out if you need to purchase a carbon monoxide detector.
1/27/2015 Melissa, we are committed to providing the highest level of service and would like to hear more… Melissa, we are committed to providing the highest level of service and would like to hear more about your personal situation. Please email steve, our Customer Relations Specialist at [email protected] or give him a call at 925-318-4795.  Hopefully, you will give us the opportunity to make this right. Read more
Eventually, every homeowner experiences a malfunction in their heating unit. It’s a cold morning and you hike the thermostat up like you usually do to take the chill off, but you get no response. You don’t hear the system firing up or feel the radiators or air vents producing any heat. You hope it’s just a quick fix, like a clogged filter or a tripped circuit breaker. On the other hand, you might be wondering if it’s more cost-effective to just have the unit replaced.
If you believe that the ac not working or you’re getting little or no cold air, check these three things first. Make sure all the registers in the house are wide open. Then be sure the furnace filter is clean. Then go outside and clean off the condenser coils (Photo 2). If several registers were closed or the filter was clogged, the reduced airflow could have caused the evaporator coil to ice up and stop cooling your home. If you’ve changed the filter and opened all the registers and you’re still not getting airflow at the registers, deice the A-coil. Move the thermostat mode switch from “Cooling” to “Off” and move the fan switch from “Auto” to “On.” Let the blower run for at least 30 minutes or until there’s good airflow at the registers. Then turn the AC back on to test it. If it works for the next 12 hours, you’ve solved the problem.
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