Denver HVAC Repair

James Harrison's first mechanical ice-making machine began operation in 1851 on the banks of the Barwon River at Rocky Point in Geelong, Australia. His first commercial ice-making machine followed in 1853, and his patent for an ether vapor compression refrigeration system was granted in 1855. This novel system used a compressor to force the refrigeration gas to pass through a condenser, where it cooled down and liquefied. The liquefied gas then circulated through the refrigeration coils and vaporized again, cooling down the surrounding system. The machine produced 3,000 kilograms (6,600 lb) of ice per day.[citation needed]
At Reliable Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning, we combine skilled workmanship with dedicated customer service to earn your complete satisfaction.  Whether you are in need of new HVAC installation, replacement, maintenance, repair, air quality solutions, or duct sealing, we draw from extensive hands-on experience, quality products, and advanced training to maximize value and rewards.
Air changes per hour Bake-out Building envelope Convection Dilution Domestic energy consumption Enthalpy Fluid dynamics Gas compressor Heat pump and refrigeration cycle Heat transfer Humidity Infiltration Latent heat Noise control Outgassing Particulates Psychrometrics Sensible heat Stack effect Thermal comfort Thermal destratification Thermal mass Thermodynamics Vapour pressure of water
At Peachtree Service Experts in Tucker, we recognize that for most people, purchasing a new furnace is a big deal. If you’ve been continually ignoring your furnace, don’t put it off any longer: We can take you through the process of purchasing, installation, and maintenance, because frankly, it’s comforting to work with a team who’s been through the purchase process hundreds of times. You wouldn’t ask a plumber to fix a refrigerator, and the same principle applies for heating and cooling systems. When your service provider is competent and efficient, you’ll save money and increase your peace of mind in one fell swoop.

Here’s a simple test to try on your own: When it’s hotter than 80 degrees outside, turn on your AC unit, and set it to well below room temperature. Let it run for 15 minutes, then use a thermometer to check just outside the return duct (the area where air flows in to be cooled). Now take a temperature reading just outside the strongest, most easily accessible vent (where cool air should be flowing out). Subtract the second reading from the first. If the difference between these two is fewer than 14 degrees, your HVAC unit might need work. 


Fresh-Aire UV is an innovation leader in the field of indoor air quality. Our award-winning UV light and carbon products fight mold, bacteria, viruses and odors in commercial and residential HVACR systems. Our products include Blue-Tube UV®, the world’s most popular germicidal UV light, the revolutionary APCO® PCO/carbon whole-house air purifier, and Mini UV the first UV light system designed specifically for mini-split AC systems.

Stay away front his company!!! In 2008 I had the company send Rick a technician to do warranty work on my new house. I complained about my house being hot in the summer. Tech said that I had a delta t of 14 degrees (the difference of temp coming into the return and out the supply) and that system was functioning properly. Unfortunately I took their word. After 8 years of being hot I called a reputable company to come and check my system again. The HVAC system still operating with a delta t of 14 degrees. The new company looked at my HVAC system owner manual. They calculated my dry bulb temp and wet bulb temp and used the chart in the owners manual to determine that the system wasn't functioning properly. After the new company came a put two pounds of freon into my HVAC system I now have a 20 degree Delta t. Do not do business with this company not trust worthy!
If the condenser coils are clogged, the compressor can overheat and shut down. You’ll experience intermittent periods of minimal cooling, followed by no cooling. Even if you’re “sure” the condenser coils are clean, clean them again. Turn off the power. Flip the air conditioning service and furnace circuit breakers in your main electrical panel to the “Off” position. Next, turn off the power switch right at the furnace or air handler. Then yank the disconnect block (Photo 1) and clean the condenser coils (Photo 2). If the air conditioning service still doesn’t work properly after you’ve cleaned the condenser coils, installed a new filter and opened all the supply vents, proceed with the following repairs.
Energy efficiency can be improved even more in central heating systems by introducing zoned heating. This allows a more granular application of heat, similar to non-central heating systems. Zones are controlled by multiple thermostats. In water heating systems the thermostats control zone valves, and in forced air systems they control zone dampers inside the vents which selectively block the flow of air. In this case, the control system is very critical to maintaining a proper temperature.
The heat-exchanger cools the air that is being forced through it by the furnace blower. As the warm air comes in contact with this cool surface the water in the air condenses. By pulling the water molecules from the air. According to the psychometric chart[42] as relative humidity decreases in order to feel cool you will have to lower the temperature even more. A common way to counteract this effect is by installing a whole-home humidifier.[43] Similarly, installing a high efficient system this need to turn the temperature down wont have such and influence on your energy costs.

The manufacture and use of CFCs has been banned or severely restricted due to concerns about ozone depletion (see also Montreal Protocol).[63][64] In light of these environmental concerns, beginning on November 14, 1994, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has restricted the sale, possession and use of refrigerant to only licensed technicians, per rules under sections 608 and 609 of the Clean Air Act.[65]
Yes. You should expect to pay a diagnostic fee to cover the cost of the technician's visit, the diagnosis of your air conditioner's problem, and a quote for the repair options. You will be advised of the issue along with recommended options to correct it, which may include a system replacement if your unit is old or significantly damaged. If you decide to replace the system, the diagnostic fee will be credited toward your replacement purchase.

"Our Pro was the most courteous and informative gentleman that we have had the pleasure to work with, was great. He let us know immediately what the problem was and what the cost to fix it would be. Also, he let us know how to maintain and extend the life of our washer. He was very personable and made us very comfortable with the process. We would have him back in a heartbeat if anything ever goes wrong again. It was the best experience we have ever had with a appliance repair service."


In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]


If you have an older central air conditioner, you might choose to replace the outdoor compressor with a modern, high-efficiency unit. If you do so, consult a local heating and cooling contractor to assure that the new compressor is properly matched to the indoor unit. However, considering recent changes in refrigerants and air conditioning designs, it might be wiser to replace the entire system.
All modern air conditioning systems, even small window package units, are equipped with internal air filters. These are generally of a lightweight gauzy material, and must be replaced or washed as conditions warrant. For example, a building in a high dust environment, or a home with furry pets, will need to have the filters changed more often than buildings without these dirt loads. Failure to replace these filters as needed will contribute to a lower heat exchange rate, resulting in wasted energy, shortened equipment life, and higher energy bills; low air flow can result in iced-over evaporator coils, which can completely stop air flow. Additionally, very dirty or plugged filters can cause overheating during a heating cycle, and can result in damage to the system or even fire.
As an Atlanta resident, you’re well aware that the weather in our area can go through extremes of both hot and cold throughout the year, taxing your heating and cooling system to its limits. You’ll likely encounter the need for repair or replacement at some point. If you need HVAC installation, HVAC maintenance, or HVAC service and repair, R.S. Andrews is the most trusted name in Atlanta.
A contactor is a $25 mechanical relay that uses low-voltage power from the thermostat to switch 220-volt high-amperage current to the compressor and condenser fan. AC contactors can wear out and are at the top of the list of common air conditioning service failures. Even if your contactor is working, it pays to replace it every five years or so. Unscrew the old contactor before removing the wires. Then move the wires to the new unit (photo 6).
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