Denver HVAC Repair

The most common signs that the air conditioning unit may soon break down include loud or strange noises coming from the unit or warmer than normal air being released. In addition, if your unit smells bad, is frosty or water is leaking, chances are, you’re in need of repair. When the air conditioning unit displays these symptoms, contact a local HVAC pro. Just like a low tank of gas, it’s better to gas now versus running out in the middle of a 95-degree July afternoon.
We’re located in Pella and service the surrounding area, so feel free to swing by if you’re looking for a new furnace or want to set up an appointment to have one of our techs do a consultation at your home and help you learn which system is ideal for your home. Schedule furnace repair or a furnace service appointment with Van Haaften Plumbing & Heating using our online scheduler, or if you want help more urgently, give us a call at 641-628-3621. 
Pay by Experience for an HVAC Service Technician has a positive trend. An entry-level HVAC Service Technician with less than 5 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $38,000 based on 2,151 salaries provided by anonymous users. Average total compensation includes tips, bonus, and overtime pay. An HVAC Service Technician with mid-career experience which includes employees with 5 to 10 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $47,000 based on 1,397 salaries. An experienced HVAC Service Technician which includes employees with 10 to 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $53,000 based on 1,643 salaries. An HVAC Service Technician with late-career experience which includes employees with greater than 20 years of experience can expect to earn an average total compensation of $59,000 based on 1,021 salaries.

After one company just took a cursory glance at our A/C and found nothing wrong, I called HVAC. I called them mostly based on Michael W's post on 8/10/14 where he told us the owner, Alberto, took his feedback and took it SERIOUSLY. That speaks VOLUMES to anyone who has been around long enough to know the characteristics of the serious players are and those who are the wannabes.
Change your air filter. Air filters need changed every 30 to 90 days, depending on the type of filter you have. It’s a wise idea to get on a regular schedule – note filter changes on your calendar, and make a note to check them every month during the summer, when your system runs ‘round the clock. Follow these filter change instructions to get the job done.
PSNC Energy appliance sales, installation, maintenance, and repair are not a part of the regulated services offered by PSNC Energy and are not in any way sanctioned by the North Carolina Utilities Commission. There is no advantage to customers of PSNC Energy if they buy these products or services from PSNC Energy. A customer does not have to buy such products or services in order to continue to receive the same safe and reliable natural gas service from PSNC Energy.
In the UK, the Ozone Regulations[62] came into force in 2000 and banned the use of ozone depleting HCFC refrigerants such as R22 in new systems. The Regulation banned the use of R22 as a "top-up" fluid for maintenance between 2010 (for virgin fluid) and 2015 (for recycled fluid). This means that equipment that uses R22 can still operate, as long as it does not leak. Although R22 is now banned, units that use the refrigerant can still be serviced and maintained.

“Robinson Air = top notch professionals. Mike was personable, knowledgeable, timely, thorough, and left me with a hard copy of prioritized recommendations and his explanations of HVAC needs I may have in the future. I was very impressed with being shown a tablet picture of a possible problem. It was so refreshing to have the service and all phone interactions handled so well and smoothly…thank you for taking the “angst” out of this kind of service call. My hat is off to you and I will happily recommend you to family and friends. Thank you!!!”
The most recognized standards for HVAC design are based on ASHRAE data. The most general of four volumes of the ASHRAE Handbook is Fundamentals; it includes heating and cooling calculations. Each volume of the ASHRAE Handbook is updated every four years. The design professional must consult ASHRAE data for the standards of design and care as the typical building codes provide little to no information on HVAC design practices; codes such as the UMC and IMC do include much detail on installation requirements, however. Other useful reference materials include items from SMACNA, ACGIH, and technical trade journals.

HVAC is an important part of residential structures such as single family homes, apartment buildings, hotels and senior living facilities, medium to large industrial and office buildings such as skyscrapers and hospitals, on ships and submarines, and in marine environments, where safe and healthy building conditions are regulated with respect to temperature and humidity, using fresh air from outdoors.


We offer maintenance and tune-ups for all brands of central heating and air conditioning equipment. Systems serviced include central air conditioners, furnaces, heat pumps, and air quality systems such as whole-home humidifiers, dehumidifiers, and air cleaners. Tune-up service is also available for oil furnaces, ductless mini splits and boilers in many markets.
In very dry climates, evaporative coolers, sometimes referred to as swamp coolers or desert coolers, are popular for improving coolness during hot weather. An evaporative cooler is a device that draws outside air through a wet pad, such as a large sponge soaked with water. The sensible heat of the incoming air, as measured by a dry bulb thermometer, is reduced. The temperature of the incoming air is reduced, but it is also more humid, so the total heat (sensible heat plus latent heat) is unchanged. Some of the sensible heat of the entering air is converted to latent heat by the evaporation of water in the wet cooler pads. If the entering air is dry enough, the results can be quite substantial.

Outside of your home is an outdoor unit, which is called a condenser. Inside the condenser is a compressor, a condenser coil, and a large fan. The compressor pumps cool refrigerant to an evaporator coil located either in the air handler or just outside the furnace. The evaporator coil gets really cold so that when the blower or furnace pushes warm air past it, the air is cooled. This cool air is then distributed throughout your home through a series of air ducts. Heat is absorbed by the evaporator coil, which warms the refrigerant moving through the coils. This warm refrigerant is then pumped back outside to the condenser coil, where a giant fan cools it off allowing the warm air to escape. This cycle is repeated until your thermostat detects that your home has reached the temperature you set it to.

Allow our experts to help with any of your heating and cooling needs or questions. Our wide array of expertise and background will benefit you and your home, whether you are considering a replacement system or evaluating your whole system to check for areas of improvement. We can help you reach your optimum indoor comfort. Give us a ring at 866-397-3787 or request an appointment online.
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