Denver HVAC Repair

If your air ducts have been damaged, you’ll need to replace them. The national average air duct replacement cost is $150-$280, which may not include materials. Factors such as duct material, labor, location of ducts and linear feet of ductwork will all affect your final costs. Labor costs will vary based on how accessible the ducts are and what material your ducts are made of. The least expensive duct material is a flexible, non-metallic ducting that costs approximately $1-$2 per linear foot. Flexible aluminum is generally more expensive and stronger than non-metallic ducting. Stainless steel ducting is the strongest, the least flexible (meaning installing it typically has higher labor rates), and usually the most expensive. An average price for air duct replacement could range between $35 and $55 per linear foot, including basic materials and labor. A typical single-family home has 6-10 duct runs; replacing or installing one duct run could average $150-$250 for labor.

We do our best to screen all of our hvac contractors. However, there are still some hvac contractor professionals in Portland that have not been pre-screened. This means that their licenses may not be up to date to operate in Portland or OR. Always be sure to pre-screen them yourself before hiring. Here are some unscreened professionals offering hvac:
Its difficult to describe how good of an experience I had with Cobb heat and AC. Ill put it like this, I have gone two 3 other AC repair companies, they send out their most novice field engineer, they give me a 6000 dollar quote to replace my AC for a property I just purchased, and then they leave. Mr Cobb came out himself, figured out the issue cleaned the condenser coils and told me my unit was only a YEAR OLD!!! He did not try to up-sale me or BS me with a quote to replace the boiler which I have had happen as well as the ac unit. Other AC companies suck, I'm sticking with Cobb. hope that helps
The standards do not require you to change your existing central air conditioning units, and replacement parts and services should still be available for your home’s systems. The “lifespan” of a central air conditioner is about 15 to 20 years. Manufacturers typically continue to support existing equipment by making replacement parts available and honoring maintenance contracts after the new standard goes into effect.

HVAC equipment is estimated to last about 15 to 20 years. Yet over the years, parts go out and need to be repaired. Heat sensors, exchangers, and ducts can become worn out. Air conditioning motors may need repairing from time to time. For repairs to your heating and air conditioning systems, and even general maintenance, let HomeAdvisor help. Enter your zip code and let us connect you with prescreened HVAC repair services near you.


Before you service an air conditioner, make sure the unit is turned completely off by unplugging or shutting off the circuit breaker. Then, rake off any debris from the unit and use a soft brush to remove dirt from the outside cover. If the small copper pipe connecting the unit to the house feels hot, the unit’s coils likely needs to be washed. Remove the outside cover, cover the motor and wiring with a plastic sheet, and hose down the fins, coils, and inside of the unit. Finally, replace the cover when you’re done.
In the fall you should prepare your HVAC unit for winter. Turn off your air conditioner’s circuit, then hose it off to remove debris. It must dry completely. Do this when it’s warm enough that there’s no risk of the water freezing. Cover the exposed pipes with foam pipe insulation ($1-$3), and protect your entire unit with a weatherproof cover ($20-$50).

At Reliable Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning, we combine skilled workmanship with dedicated customer service to earn your complete satisfaction.  Whether you are in need of new HVAC installation, replacement, maintenance, repair, air quality solutions, or duct sealing, we draw from extensive hands-on experience, quality products, and advanced training to maximize value and rewards.
This is a very common air conditioning problem. The unit will cool for a few hours and then it stops cooling all together. The next day or several hours later the air conditioning is cooling again but for only a few hours and then the air conditioning stops again. The reason this is happening is because the air conditioning unit is low on refrigerant because you have a refrigerant leak (the unit could freeze because of a few other air conditioning problems but this is the most common reason).

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An example of a geothermal heat pump that uses a body of water as the heat sink, is the system used by the Trump International Hotel and Tower in Chicago, Illinois. This building is situated on the Chicago River, and uses cold river water by pumping it into a recirculating cooling system, where heat exchangers transfer heat from the building into the water, and then the now-warmed water is pumped back into the Chicago River.[21]

Believe it or not, the evaporator coils inside the AHU (Air Handling Unit) are freezing. You may notice the refrigerant lines on the condenser or at the AHU are frozen with ice build-up. The frost or ice builds up on the evaporator coils and blocks air flow (low air flow and no cooling are a sign of a low charge). A low refrigerant charge will cause the evaporator coil to operate at or below freezing. Since the coil typically operates below the dew point, it draws condensation out of the air. When the evaporator coil begins operating below freezing all this condensation freezes to the evaporator coil and the unit stops cooling.
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If the AC doesn’t turn off, it may be time to clean the condensing unit. Dirty condenser coils won’t give off heat efficiently and will keep the unit running.  Another possibility: The contacts on the outdoor run relay may have welded together—something that can happen over time because of frequent electrical arcing at the relay. Before checking the run relay, turn off the power to the furnace and the condensing unit. Next, disassemble the relay and pry apart the contacts. This should do the trick until you buy a replacement—which you should do soon.
When central air conditioning service fails during a heat spell, you may have to wait days for an HVAC repair technician or a ac contractor to show up, and you’ll probably pay at least several hundred for the repair. But if you’re comfortable working around electricity and are willing to spend about $50 on parts, you can probably repair your air conditioning service yourself in about two hours and save about $225 on parts markup and labor.
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