Denver HVAC Repair

The main problem when installing a multi-split system is the laying of long refrigerant lines for connecting the external unit to the internal ones. While installing a separate split system, workers try to locate both units opposite to each other, where the length of the line is minimal. Installing a multi-split system creates more difficulties, since some of indoor units can be located far from the outside. The first models of multi-split systems had one common control system that did not allow you to set the air conditioning individually for each room. However, now the market has a wide selection of multi-split systems, in which the functional characteristics of indoor units operate separately from each other.
Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.

Tony from HVAC came out on Sunday morning and did a fantastic job of immediately diagnosing the issue, quickly fixing the problem, and honoring the coupons I had.  When I initially called on Saturday morning, I had a lot of trouble with their answering service getting their wires crossed with their technicians.  However, Tony called me back and made it right.  He even pointed out an issue that is in the horizon that I should look at (without charging me extra or telling me I had to fix it right now). Great service!
While there's nothing you can do to guarantee your air conditioner or furnace will never need repairs, there are ways to take better care of your system. Changing out the air filters every 3-6 months, making sure nothing is obstructing or interfering with the outside unit, and keeping all vents unblocked in well-used rooms will help keep your air conditioning and heating system operating efficiently.
How often you should clean your air ducts depends on your situation. If you or someone in the home has asthma or is acutely allergic to certain airborne materials or pollen, regular duct cleaning may be helpful. The Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have an official position on the necessity of air duct cleaning unless the ducts have been contaminated by rodents, insects or mold, or you are aware of particles blowing out through the vents. The EPA recommends you have your air ducts cleaned on an as-needed basis. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) suggests having air ducts cleaned every three to five years.
Edwards Heating & Air continues to look for new ways to improve service.  We hire only NATE-certified, extensively experienced, and dedicated professionals.  We offer a wide range of products, from ductless options to heat pumps, furnaces, air conditioners, and air quality systems, guaranteed to answer the most challenging comfort demands.  To maintain your equipment in peak condition, promoting year after year of uninterrupted performance, we offer preventative service plans that are affordable, convenient, and effective.  If you are ever confronted with a malfunction, the team from Edwards Heating & Air is always available, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to provide the skilled assistance you need. Through our relationship with Wells Fargo Financial National Bank, we offer flexible financing options with approved credit to facilitate your investment into superior quality heating and cooling.  Our ongoing dedication to your complete satisfaction is evidenced by our complaint-free, A+ rating by the Better Business Bureau.  At Edwards Heating & Air, we do things right, every time.

Be cautious with companies that offer “whole house air duct cleaning,” urges the NADCA. The company may be using unscrupulous tactics to upsell you once they get started. Before any work begins, always clarify in writing what the job entails and what the cost will be. To protect yourself against fraud, read customer reviews and verify that your HVAC cleaning service has applicable licenses and certifications.
Ventilation, air conditioning and heating systems require regular maintenance for them to work efficiently. You’ll likely need tune-ups and repairs for them at some point during their lifespan. However, no matter how much preventative maintenance you put into your HVAC system, there comes a time when repairs aren’t enough anymore and it’s time for a replacement.
Reinstall the access panel and disconnect block. Turn on the circuit breaker and furnace switch. Then set the thermostat to a lower temperature and wait for the AC to start (see “Be Patient at Startup,” below). The compressor should run and the condenser fan should spin. If the compressor starts but the fan doesn’t, the fan motor is most likely shot. Shut off the power and remove the screws around the condenser cover. Lift the cover and remove the fan blade and motor (photo 7). Reinstall the blade and secure the cover. Then repower the unit and see if the fan starts. If it doesn’t, you’ve given it your best shot—it’s time to call a pro.
There is nothing worse than having your air conditioner break in the middle of a long, hot summer. You can ensure your air conditioning unit stays in working order all year long with regular service. Sometimes, however, repairs are necessary whether it’s fixing the evaporator, capacitor, or condenser or recharging the refrigerant. Most air conditioner repairs cost between $163 and $528 with most homeowners reporting that they spend about $344. If you do need a repair, here is some information to help you get it done quickly, professionally, and economically.
The contactor (relay) and start/run capacitor(s) (see illustration below) fail most often and are inexpensive. So it’s a safe bet to buy and install those parts right away, especially if your air conditioning service unit is older than five years. The condenser fan motor can also fail, but it runs about $150 — hold off buying that unless you’re sure that’s the culprit.
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