Denver HVAC Repair

Stay away front his company!!! In 2008 I had the company send Rick a technician to do warranty work on my new house. I complained about my house being hot in the summer. Tech said that I had a delta t of 14 degrees (the difference of temp coming into the return and out the supply) and that system was functioning properly. Unfortunately I took their word. After 8 years of being hot I called a reputable company to come and check my system again. The HVAC system still operating with a delta t of 14 degrees. The new company looked at my HVAC system owner manual. They calculated my dry bulb temp and wet bulb temp and used the chart in the owners manual to determine that the system wasn't functioning properly. After the new company came a put two pounds of freon into my HVAC system I now have a 20 degree Delta t. Do not do business with this company not trust worthy!

While there's nothing you can do to guarantee your air conditioner or furnace will never need repairs, there are ways to take better care of your system. Changing out the air filters every 3-6 months, making sure nothing is obstructing or interfering with the outside unit, and keeping all vents unblocked in well-used rooms will help keep your air conditioning and heating system operating efficiently.


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If you believe that the ac not working or you’re getting little or no cold air, check these three things first. Make sure all the registers in the house are wide open. Then be sure the furnace filter is clean. Then go outside and clean off the condenser coils (Photo 2). If several registers were closed or the filter was clogged, the reduced airflow could have caused the evaporator coil to ice up and stop cooling your home. If you’ve changed the filter and opened all the registers and you’re still not getting airflow at the registers, deice the A-coil. Move the thermostat mode switch from “Cooling” to “Off” and move the fan switch from “Auto” to “On.” Let the blower run for at least 30 minutes or until there’s good airflow at the registers. Then turn the AC back on to test it. If it works for the next 12 hours, you’ve solved the problem.
Central, "all-air" air-conditioning systems (or package systems) with a combined outdoor condenser/evaporator unit are often installed in North American residences, offices, and public buildings, but are difficult to retrofit (install in a building that was not designed to receive it) because of the bulky air ducts required. (Minisplit ductless systems are used in these situations.) Outside of North America, packaged systems are only used in limited applications involving large indoor space such as stadiums, theatres or exhibition halls.
In 1820, English scientist and inventor Michael Faraday discovered that compressing and liquefying ammonia could chill air when the liquefied ammonia was allowed to evaporate. In 1842, Florida physician John Gorrie used compressor technology to create ice, which he used to cool air for his patients in his hospital in Apalachicola, Florida. He hoped to eventually use his ice-making machine to regulate the temperature of buildings. He even envisioned centralized air conditioning that could cool entire cities. Though his prototype leaked and performed irregularly, Gorrie was granted a patent in 1851 for his ice-making machine. Though his process improved the artificial production of ice, his hopes for its success vanished soon afterwards when his chief financial backer died and Gorrie did not get the money he needed to develop the machine. According to his biographer, Vivian M. Sherlock, he blamed the "Ice King", Frederic Tudor, for his failure, suspecting that Tudor had launched a smear campaign against his invention. Dr. Gorrie died impoverished in 1855, and the dream of commonplace air conditioning went away for 50 years.[citation needed]

Should I repair or replace my HVAC? It’s a common question — and you need to weigh several factors to make the decision. One of the most significant factors is the lifespan of your unit. According to EnergyStar — a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency voluntary program — an A.C. unit lasts about 15 to 20 years. On average, a heat pump perseveres for 16 years and a furnace functions for between 15 to 20 years, reports This Old House.
New heating and cooling equipment installations present a wide variety of options that can save you money on your power bills and reduce the amount of HVAC maintenance and service that will ultimately be required over the life of your new unit. Energy-efficient options like heat pumps, two-stage furnaces, air-to-heat exchangers (HRVs), and programmable thermostats can all go a long way toward increasing efficiency and extending the life expectancy of your system.
You should also have air ducts cleaned after recent water contamination or water damage to prevent mold; after renovations or remodeling to ensure debris and dust didn’t settle in the vents and ducts; if you are having problems with allergies or asthma; or when you are moving into a newly purchased home, especially if the previous owners smoked or had pets. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) recommends getting your air ducts cleaned every three to five years, or every two to three years in regions where homeowners use their air conditioning and heater for many months of the year, while the EPA suggests homeowners have duct cleaning done as needed.
Just like running a marathon, we perform better at full strength. If we’re not feeling great, it’s that much harder to finish the race. Similarly, when you set your thermostat to a certain temperature, the system is tasked with maintaining that temperature throughout the room. Working at full strength, the system can easily maintain that temperature (as long as it’s not below 60 degrees or above 80 degrees). However, when injured, the system may struggle to keep the room at your desired temperature. As such, it’s working harder, which means higher utility bills.
In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term "air conditioning", using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to "water conditioning", then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to "condition" and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[10]
If you live in a warmer climate, your AC is likely one of the most essential pieces of equipment for your home. The best course is to perform regular routine air conditioner maintenance to ensure its smooth operation during the warmest months of the year. Annual tune-ups by a professional HVAC technician will increase the lifespan of your unit. When repairs are needed, be sure to hire a technician trained and certified in HVAC repair for best results. Following these guidelines will ensure that you are comfortable and cool through the summer season.
HVAC.com is the top heating and air conditioning resource site in the world! As you search for a contractor, check out our Resource Center and the HVAC.com Blog to find answers to any heating, air conditioning, or indoor air quality question. Learn about the types of systems used in homes and businesses, how to vet contractors, and more which will best prepare you for working with the pros you’ll find through our directory.
Without proper ventilation, carbon monoxide can be lethal at concentrations of 1000 ppm (0.1%). However, at several hundred ppm, carbon monoxide exposure induces headaches, fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. Carbon monoxide binds with hemoglobin in the blood, forming carboxyhemoglobin, reducing the blood's ability to transport oxygen. The primary health concerns associated with carbon monoxide exposure are its cardiovascular and neurobehavioral effects. Carbon monoxide can cause atherosclerosis (the hardening of arteries) and can also trigger heart attacks. Neurologically, carbon monoxide exposure reduces hand to eye coordination, vigilance, and continuous performance. It can also affect time discrimination.[15]
What type of insurance do you have? Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) professionals work on a variety of mechanical areas of the home. You'll want to ask specific questions regarding professional training and licensing, as well as what types of insurance they have (for example, mold, air pollution or worker's compensation). It's fair to ask for the dollar amounts they are covered and a quality professional will show you verification of coverage.

Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.
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