Denver HVAC Repair

Ground source, or geothermal, heat pumps are similar to ordinary heat pumps, but instead of transferring heat to or from outside air, they rely on the stable, even temperature of the earth to provide heating and air conditioning. Many regions experience seasonal temperature extremes, which would require large-capacity heating and cooling equipment to heat or cool buildings. For example, a conventional heat pump system used to heat a building in Montana's −70 °F (−57 °C) low temperature or cool a building in the highest temperature ever recorded in the US—134 °F (57 °C) in Death Valley, California, in 1913 would require a large amount of energy due to the extreme difference between inside and outside air temperatures. A few feet below the earth's surface, however, the ground remains at a relatively constant temperature. Utilizing this large source of relatively moderate temperature earth, a heating or cooling system's capacity can often be significantly reduced. Although ground temperatures vary according to latitude, at 6 feet (1.8 m) underground, temperatures generally only range from 45 to 75 °F (7 to 24 °C).
Change the filters regularly: This is one of the most important steps in system maintenance. Dirty filters mean your system has to work harder to move the air, causing poor performance and creating more wear and tear on the system. A clean filter also lowers your energy costs, since the system uses less power to do the same amount of work, and improves indoor air quality.
What type of insurance do you have? Heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) professionals work on a variety of mechanical areas of the home. You'll want to ask specific questions regarding professional training and licensing, as well as what types of insurance they have (for example, mold, air pollution or worker's compensation). It's fair to ask for the dollar amounts they are covered and a quality professional will show you verification of coverage.
New heating and cooling equipment installations present a wide variety of options that can save you money on your power bills and reduce the amount of HVAC maintenance and service that will ultimately be required over the life of your new unit. Energy-efficient options like heat pumps, two-stage furnaces, air-to-heat exchangers (HRVs), and programmable thermostats can all go a long way toward increasing efficiency and extending the life expectancy of your system.
If the condenser coils are clogged, the compressor can overheat and shut down. You’ll experience intermittent periods of minimal cooling, followed by no cooling. Even if you’re “sure” the condenser coils are clean, clean them again. Turn off the power. Flip the air conditioning service and furnace circuit breakers in your main electrical panel to the “Off” position. Next, turn off the power switch right at the furnace or air handler. Then yank the disconnect block (Photo 1) and clean the condenser coils (Photo 2). If the air conditioning service still doesn’t work properly after you’ve cleaned the condenser coils, installed a new filter and opened all the supply vents, proceed with the following repairs.
You can keep your air conditioner running efficiently with some preventative care measures. Shut off the power to your AC before cleaning it or performing any of these tasks:  clean your filter at least twice a year; remove leaves and twigs from cages; clean the fins with a garden hose or special spray, then use a butter knife to straighten any that are crooked; keep your yard clean so the fins won't get blocked; cover the unit up for winter; and make sure it's level or you run the risk of damaging the inner workings of the unit.

We service, repair and install most every type of hvac system whether it’s gas, electric or oil, on hvac systems (furnaces, heatpumps air conditioning untis and boilers) by Trane, Bryant, York, Goodman, Lennox, Rheem, Panasonic, Fujitsu and many more.  Our service area is mainly around the I-97 to Rout 32 corridor specifically Annapolis, Crownsville, Severna Park, Millersville, Gambrills, Crofton, Odenton, Severn, Fort Meade, Jessup, Elkridge through Columbia, MD.
At Reliable Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning, we combine skilled workmanship with dedicated customer service to earn your complete satisfaction.  Whether you are in need of new HVAC installation, replacement, maintenance, repair, air quality solutions, or duct sealing, we draw from extensive hands-on experience, quality products, and advanced training to maximize value and rewards.
Natural ventilation is the ventilation of a building with outside air without using fans or other mechanical systems. It can be via operable windows, louvers, or trickle vents when spaces are small and the architecture permits. In more complex schemes, warm air is allowed to rise and flow out high building openings to the outside (stack effect), causing cool outside air to be drawn into low building openings. Natural ventilation schemes can use very little energy, but care must be taken to ensure comfort. In warm or humid climates, maintaining thermal comfort solely via natural ventilation might not be possible. Air conditioning systems are used, either as backups or supplements. Air-side economizers also use outside air to condition spaces, but do so using fans, ducts, dampers, and control systems to introduce and distribute cool outdoor air when appropriate.
Many homes in Portland don't have air conditioning of any kind. Whether your home is decades old or just a few years, the wisdom is that the moderate climate of Portland will be enough to keep you comfortable. In fact, when building a home, you typically need to request air conditioning installation from your home builder. With an average of only two weeks or so worth of days that hit 90 degrees, many people simply can't justify the expense. Of course, HomeAdvisor does see quite a few Portland air conditioning installation requests, simply because so many homeowners don't have central air. If you've decided it's time to indulge yourself or have recently moved into a Portland home without air conditioning, we can help you find a contractor who will help you with any or all of your A/C needs.
Before selecting the installation location of air conditioner, several main factors need to be considered. First of all, the direction of air flow from the indoor units should not fall on the place of rest or work area. Secondly, there should not be any obstacles on the way of the airflow that might prevent it from covering the space of the premises as much as possible. The outdoor unit must also be located in an open space, otherwise the heat from the house will not be effectively discharged outside and the productivity of the entire system will drop sharply. It is highly advisable to install the air conditioner units in easily accessible places, for further maintenance during operation.
    Second, there are the diagnostics involved as well as the return trip to effect the actual repair. What about the hidden costs such as having the part picked up at the supplier, was this considered? As for the parts manager at our shop having wasted time tracking the part down, it often happens that we have to contact several suppliers to find parts especially during the recent cold spell when so many suppliers were out of stock of even the most common service items due to demand being so high.
Our A/C was blowing hot air intermittently...it was cold one minute and warm the next. By 8pm I'd have a 90 degree interior temp. After one company just took a cursory glance at our A/C and found nothing wrong, I called HVAC. I called them mostly based on Michael W's post on 8/10/14 where he told us the owner, Alberto, took his feedback and took it SERIOUSLY. That speaks VOLUMES to anyone who has been around long enough to know the characteristics of the serious players are and those who are the wannabes. So HVAC sent Tony Diaz to my house. I was at work so he was subjected to the most excruciatingly exacting woman on the planet (my wife). Tony impressed her with his friendliness, professionalism and the obvious jouneyman-level knowledge of his craft. He found literally --burnt-out-- parts in our system and replaced them. It cost us a bit but I know enough about the parts to see there was no gouging on the parts and a fair rate for the labor. It wasn't cheap but it was fair and worth every dime. And now i have A/C in my house again and a repairman came to my house, actually FIXED something AND managed to do so in a friendly & professional manner. That used to be commonplace...nowadays it deserves a "Wow".. Thank you, Tony!
Outside of your home is an outdoor unit, which is called a condenser. Inside the condenser is a compressor, a condenser coil, and a large fan. The compressor pumps cool refrigerant to an evaporator coil located either in the air handler or just outside the furnace. The evaporator coil gets really cold so that when the blower or furnace pushes warm air past it, the air is cooled. This cool air is then distributed throughout your home through a series of air ducts. Heat is absorbed by the evaporator coil, which warms the refrigerant moving through the coils. This warm refrigerant is then pumped back outside to the condenser coil, where a giant fan cools it off allowing the warm air to escape. This cycle is repeated until your thermostat detects that your home has reached the temperature you set it to.

Your heating and cooling equipment is vital to your comfort and breakdowns can be stressful, inconvenient and even dangerous. You can rely on the professionals at One Hour Heating and Air Conditioning* for expert service when you need it most. Our highly-trained technicians are available around the clock to meet your heating and cooling needs. We'll install, repair and maintain your HVAC system, keeping it in peak condition. Give us a call when you need to:


Packaged terminal air conditioner (PTAC) systems are also known as wall-split air conditioning systems.[36] They are ductless systems. PTACs, which are frequently used in hotels, have two separate units (terminal packages), the evaporative unit on the interior and the condensing unit on the exterior, with an opening passing through the wall and connecting them. This minimizes the interior system footprint and allows each room to be adjusted independently. PTAC systems may be adapted to provide heating in cold weather, either directly by using an electric strip, gas, or other heater, or by reversing the refrigerant flow to heat the interior and draw heat from the exterior air, converting the air conditioner into a heat pump. While room air conditioning provides maximum flexibility, when used to cool many rooms at a time it is generally more expensive than central air conditioning.
Some systems include an "economizer mode", which is sometimes called a "free-cooling mode". When economizing, the control system will open (fully or partially) the outside air damper and close (fully or partially) the return air damper. This will cause fresh, outside air to be supplied to the system. When the outside air is cooler than the demanded cool air, this will allow the demand to be met without using the mechanical supply of cooling (typically chilled water or a direct expansion "DX" unit), thus saving energy. The control system can compare the temperature of the outside air vs. return air, or it can compare the enthalpy of the air, as is frequently done in climates where humidity is more of an issue. In both cases, the outside air must be less energetic than the return air for the system to enter the economizer mode.
After my initial meeting with HVAC Service I had really high hopes and thought these guys were going to be my HVAC go to company. However, it did not pan out this way whatsoever. Initial estimate meeting - This was the initial meeting I thought I found the go to company. Alberto was friendly, punctual, and knowledgeable. I asked some very basic questions and Alberto was able to explain the why's and why not's of each of my questions. Overall I felt really comfortable with Alberto and was extremely impressed. Then it goes all downhill..... Alberto said they were busy but could either install on the upcoming Saturday. We were going to be out of town and said unfortunately that day did not work. He then proposed the upcoming Tuesday as a possible solution, but just had to confirm with another appointment. I said great. I will review the estimate and call your office to confirm I want to move forward with the install. Within 1-hour of Alberto leaving (probably more like 30 minutes) I called the office to confirm I wanted to move forward with the install and to please confirm that Tuesday will be the install day. The lady on the phone said that she will get in touch with Alberto and call me back. This was on a Friday. On Monday I had not received a call from HVAC Service so I called to follow up. The lady on the phone said they were not able to secure a crane for Tuesday and that the install would not be taking place. Fine, no problem I understand. Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all. I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed. You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything. She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane. I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update. Surprise, surprise, no phone call. I call to follow up at the end of the next day and she said that she has not been able to get in touch with the owner. By this time, I am starting to get frustrated because I am starting to get the run around. I question her if I am even on the schedule or if they attempted to schedule a crane. She says they are extremely busy and that she does not know. So I say, basically I have waited over 2 weeks and you have not put me on the schedule and I am at the end of the install line. No answer. I tell her to talk to her boss and find out what is happening, and I will think about what direction I want to move in at this point. Monday the following week, no phone calls, or follow up. I call to get an update and am told that they cannot install my system because they don't have time. I ask what does that mean, one year? One week? Until the end of summer they say. What does that mean I ask? They say at the end of September. I say thank you for wasting 1 month of my time. How could they have served me better without serving me? 1. Be honest and let me know as soon as possible that the install was going to be delayed and probably not happen until the end of summer. Don't waste a month of my time. I could have reached out to a different company in the time I was waiting for them. 2. Communicate! the thing that upsets me the most is I was the one making all the calls to them. Not once did they ever call me to say we have not forgot about you, or this is what is happening. 3. Provide recommendations on other contractors who could have helped me once they realized they were too busy. I am pretty disappointed it came to this review because I really liked this company and wanted to do work with them. It is a family run business, and reminded me of the HVAC business my dad owned. Beware once you are the one that has to start calling them for updates, or to follow up; your time is probably best served by calling a different contractor.
It doesn’t matter the time, our experts will have your home back to being comfortable in no time. We stand by our workmanship so much so that we guarantee it in writing for a full year. Our 100% Satisfaction Guarantee* firmly demonstrates our commitment to providing the best heating system service in the industry. Repairing, selling and installing heating systems is something we do every day. More people trust us with their home comfort, so you know your home will be back to being warm and cozy quickly.
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
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