Denver HVAC Repair

So HVAC sent Tony Diaz to my house. I was at work so he was subjected to the most excruciatingly exacting woman on the planet (my wife). Tony impressed her with his friendliness, professionalism and the obvious jouneyman-level knowledge of his craft. He found literally --burnt-out-- parts in our system and replaced them. It cost us a bit but I know enough about the parts to see there was no gouging on the parts and a fair rate for the labor. It wasn't cheap but it was fair and worth every dime.
An air conditioning system, or a standalone air conditioner, provides cooling and humidity control for all or part of a building. Air conditioned buildings often have sealed windows, because open windows would work against the system intended to maintain constant indoor air conditions. Outside, fresh air is generally drawn into the system by a vent into the indoor heat exchanger section, creating positive air pressure. The percentage of return air made up of fresh air can usually be manipulated by adjusting the opening of this vent. Typical fresh air intake is about 10%.
After my initial meeting with HVAC Service I had really high hopes and thought these guys were going to be my HVAC go to company. However, it did not pan out this way whatsoever. Initial estimate meeting - This was the initial meeting I thought I found the go to company. Alberto was friendly, punctual, and knowledgeable. I asked some very basic questions and Alberto was able to explain the why's and why not's of each of my questions. Overall I felt really comfortable with Alberto and was extremely impressed. Then it goes all downhill..... Alberto said they were busy but could either install on the upcoming Saturday. We were going to be out of town and said unfortunately that day did not work. He then proposed the upcoming Tuesday as a possible solution, but just had to confirm with another appointment. I said great. I will review the estimate and call your office to confirm I want to move forward with the install. Within 1-hour of Alberto leaving (probably more like 30 minutes) I called the office to confirm I wanted to move forward with the install and to please confirm that Tuesday will be the install day. The lady on the phone said that she will get in touch with Alberto and call me back. This was on a Friday. On Monday I had not received a call from HVAC Service so I called to follow up. The lady on the phone said they were not able to secure a crane for Tuesday and that the install would not be taking place. Fine, no problem I understand. Two weeks go by and no phone call from HVAC Service regarding install date, or any update at all. I call them to check in to see if they have put me on the schedule and when I can expect to have the AC installed. You can tell by the discussion I had with the lady on the phone that they completely forgot about me and have not scheduled anything. She says she needs to get in contact with the owner because she has no idea on the availability of the crane. I was told that she would call me back by the end of the day with an update. Surprise, surprise, no phone call. I call to follow up at the end of the next day and she said that she has not been able to get in touch with the owner. By this time, I am starting to get frustrated because I am starting to get the run around. I question her if I am even on the schedule or if they attempted to schedule a crane. She says they are extremely busy and that she does not know. So I say, basically I have waited over 2 weeks and you have not put me on the schedule and I am at the end of the install line. No answer. I tell her to talk to her boss and find out what is happening, and I will think about what direction I want to move in at this point. Monday the following week, no phone calls, or follow up. I call to get an update and am told that they cannot install my system because they don't have time. I ask what does that mean, one year? One week? Until the end of summer they say. What does that mean I ask? They say at the end of September. I say thank you for wasting 1 month of my time. How could they have served me better without serving me? 1. Be honest and let me know as soon as possible that the install was going to be delayed and probably not happen until the end of summer. Don't waste a month of my time. I could have reached out to a different company in the time I was waiting for them. 2. Communicate! the thing that upsets me the most is I was the one making all the calls to them. Not once did they ever call me to say we have not forgot about you, or this is what is happening. 3. Provide recommendations on other contractors who could have helped me once they realized they were too busy. I am pretty disappointed it came to this review because I really liked this company and wanted to do work with them. It is a family run business, and reminded me of the HVAC business my dad owned. Beware once you are the one that has to start calling them for updates, or to follow up; your time is probably best served by calling a different contractor.

Was not satisifed with this company.  This person came out and took 10 minutes only to tell me that my unit would not last for a year and that I needed to have it replaced!  I'm not sure if he was very knowlegable or if he was just plain lazy and do not even try to fix the problem.  He just wanted to install a brand new system because he was both and of course, that's much more money for him!

5) Check certifications. Many HVAC professionals belong to the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) or the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association (SMACNA). Both sites provide listings of HVAC contractors by area. Look for contractors whose technicians are certified by North American Technician Excellence (NATE) and partnered with ENERGY STAR.
In a thermodynamically closed system, any power dissipated into the system that is being maintained at a set temperature (which is a standard mode of operation for modern air conditioners) requires that the rate of energy removal by the air conditioner increase. This increase has the effect that, for each unit of energy input into the system (say to power a light bulb in the closed system), the air conditioner removes that energy.[30] To do so, the air conditioner must increase its power consumption by the inverse of its "efficiency" (coefficient of performance) times the amount of power dissipated into the system. As an example, assume that inside the closed system a 100 W heating element is activated, and the air conditioner has a coefficient of performance of 200%. The air conditioner's power consumption will increase by 50 W to compensate for this, thus making the 100 W heating element cost a total of 150 W of power.
If so, you may want to consider replacing your entire AC system. After your AC system reaches a certain age, it makes more sense to invest in a new AC system altogether rather than repairing it one piece at a time. To learn more about John Moore’s AC replacement program, our warranty, and the cost-advantages of replacing your AC system, visit our AC Replacement page.

If your unit needs more than two pounds or charged more than once a year it is recommended you have a refrigerant leak check done to your system. You most likely have a serious refrigerant leak and it needs to be repaired. Leaking units do not operate efficiently; take their toll on the environment, and can cause serious HVAC mechanical problems in the future. Lastly, a good HVAC service tech will attempt to find the refrigerant leak within the hour’s air conditioning service you are paying for in addition to the refrigerant charge.
Central home air conditioner service systems consist of two major components: a condensing unit that sits outside your house, and the evaporator coil (often referred to as an A-coil) that sits in the plenum of your furnace or air handler. The refrigerant in the A-coil picks up the heat from your home and moves it to the outdoor condensing unit. The condensing unit fan blows outside air through the condensing coil to remove the heat. The condensing unit houses the three parts replaceable by a DIYer: the contactor, the start/run capacitor(s) and the condenser fan motor. The condensing unit also houses the compressor, but only a pro can replace that. The A-coil has no parts that can be serviced by a DIYer.
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